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  • Extra
  • Technical

General

People working in HR information roles will know that there are a variety of reports that are required throughout the year. Many of those can be variations on themes about the organisation's staff profile.

An approach to dealing with the volume of reporting is to identify a set of questions that are regularly asked and publish those profiles periodically throughout the year. These can be described as profiles of the organisation at a point in time.

There can be a few benefits to publishing point in time profiles online:

  • There is one official source of numbers that everyone references and quotes.
  • Some legislative requirements to publish data can be met.
  • Colleagues can lift the information from the profiles and include them in documents.
  • In this age of hand held technology the information can be accessed 24 hours a day seven days per week.

Extra

Profiling is much more complex than just putting together a few reports like the ones below. Setting up a template of what is required and then programming your computer to draw the charts at a particular point in time involves initial effort then thereafter it can be a maintenance task to run the reports each period. When determining what to put into point in time reports it is a decent idea to first look at legislation and best practice guidance to see what information there is a duty to produce.

An example of some requirements in Europe can be found in the European Commission Legislation and Equality Plans guidance.

With a basic HR system it is reasonably straightforward to categorise staff by one or more staff groups.

With an intergrated HR/payroll system it is possible to create accurate profiles based on pay.

Once the legislative requirements have been addressed, it is a good idea to see what information departmental colleagues need for business planning, external reporting and bid preparation. It is likely that the same type of information is needed across departments and as such it should be relatively straightforward to produce a set of profiles for departments to use.

In the UK a benefit from the above approach can arise when dealing with some Freedom of Information Act requests.

Technical

The best advice we can think of is create a table of data on the point in time date that holds all of the information that will feed the profile charts.

We suggest this simply because in large organisations live data will continue to change for a variety of legitimate reasons:

  • contractual changes
  • new starters brought on to the system - sometimes late
  • leavers closed on the system - sometimes after their leave date but before the payroll deadline
A report writer must therefore have a freeze point and report users will need to accept that a point in time profile is just that. It is the organisation's data frozen at a particular point in time.

Key Legislation Underpinning Employment Contracts

The Employment Rights Act 1996 underpins contracts of employment in the United Kingdom.

The terminolgy to use is a written statement of particulars of employment. This summarises the main particulars of the employment relationship and must according to the legislation be given within two months of the person's first day of service.

Whilst the law states two months it would actually be poor form to encourage a person to give up an existing job or prior state of affairs without actually presenting them with the contractual terms of their new role until two months after it has started. The law is quite flexible but if we are truly focused on the quality of the engagement with the prospective member of staff the written statement of particulars really should be issued as soon as possible after the decision to appoint has been made.

Issuing the written statement of particulars at the earliest point means the person is aware of what they being contracted to and can clarify any uncertainties before accepting. Starting a relationship in this manner where possible helps ensure a more harmonious contract.

The key aspects of a written statement of particulars are as follows:

  1. The names of the employer and employee.
  2. The title of the job which the employee is employed to do or a brief description of the work for which they are employed.
  3. Where the employment is not intended to be permanent, the period for which it is expected to continue.
  4. Either the place of work or, where the employee is required or permitted to work at various places, an indication of that and of the address of the employer.
  5. The date when the employment began.
  6. The date on which the employee’s period of continuous employment began (taking into account any employment with a previous employer which counts towards that period). The continuous employment date is often the same as the start date. Where it is earlier this may give the new starter certain employment rights that come with longer service.
  7. The scale or rate of remuneration/pay or the method of calculating this.
  8. The intervals at which remuneration is paid (that is, weekly, monthly or other specified intervals).
  9. Any terms and conditions relating to hours of work.
  10. Entitlement to holidays, including public holidays, and holiday pay.
  11. How incapacity for work due to sickness or injury will be handled, including any provision for sick pay.
  12. Pensions and pension schemes.
  13. The length of notice which the employee is obliged to give and entitled to receive to terminate his contract of employment.
  14. Any collective agreements which directly affect the terms and conditions of the employment. In large organisations trade unions negotiate with the employer on behalf of staff, the agreements they reach with the employer are called collective agreements.

Key to the Organisation Chart

An explanation of the symbols used

collapsed icon This icon represents a unit that has child units. Click it to see the child units.
expanded icon This icon means that a unit has its child units visible. Click to close the child units.
Unit name Click on a unit to get more information on it. If the unit has child units it will open a page showing them too.

Organisation structure details Clicking this icon takes you to some basic theory on organisation charts and structure.
collapse all button This button is Collapse All and when clicked closes all units that have been opened up.
expand all button This button is Expand All and when clicked opens all units so you will see every aspect of the tree.

Point in Time Profiles

What we have below is a rather simplistic example of how some basic information can be displayed on our fictional organisation the University of Small Bites. You will notice we have only shown some information on average pay and age bands profiled by sex. The data in relational databases is such that the information which can be aggregated is quite vast. This can then be sliced into all manner of more granular detail.

An ideal is to try to deliver information in a manner that can be accessed using hand held devices whenever users need it.

In HR information offices a huge amount of time can be saved if we determine what the organisation needs on a regular basis. This information can then be placed online at specific points in the year for colleagues to use. We call these Point in Time reports. It is also a good idea to ensure that charts can be easily saved by users for use in documents of their own.


  • UoSB

University of Small Bites
Sex Profile

Female203952.93%
Male181347.07%
Sum:3852100%

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

A very frustrating thing about the distribution of salaries in this fictitious organisation is the age old upsetting thing of pay not being equal across the sexes. Because this is a fictitious organisation this pay discrepancy can easily be corrected. In real life however it is significantly more difficult to deal with. The thing about transparent information is it helps shine a light on inequity.

University of Small Bites
Average Salary by Sex Profile

Staff GroupSex CountAverage Salary
Clinical AcademicFemale1778,475
Clinical AcademicMale7589,207
Clinical ResearchFemale1245,953
Clinical ResearchMale3048,952
Non Clin. AcademicFemale25751,554
Non Clin. AcademicMale49958,821
Non Clin. ResearchFemale20734,911
Non Clin. ResearchMale20136,283
OtherFemale154624,180
OtherMale100827,476
sum3852

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

In programming random data into the fictitious University of Small Bites it is interesting to note that the organisational age distributon forms quite a reasonable bell shaped curve with the graph falling off reasonably on either side. This distribution at the organisational level is the same for both sexes. This is not necessariy the case when we look into some of the fictional faculties.

University of Small Bites
Age Band by Sex Profile

Age BandSex Count
below 160
16 - 24Female123
16 - 24Male81
25 - 34Female442
25 - 34Male367
35 - 44Female525
35 - 44Male478
45 - 54Female558
45 - 54Male450
55 - 64Female345
55 - 64Male360
65 or overFemale46
65 or overMale77
sum3852

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Corporate Support Services
Sex Profile

Female92557.67%
Male67942.33%
Sum:1604100%

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Corporate Support Services
Average Salary by Sex Profile

Staff GroupSex CountAverage Salary
Non Clin. AcademicFemale192,855
Non Clin. AcademicMale395,771
Non Clin. ResearchFemale231,900
Non Clin. ResearchMale235,958
OtherFemale92222,653
OtherMale67426,007
sum1604

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Corporate Support Services
Age Band by Sex Profile

Age BandSex Count
below 160
16 - 24Female110
16 - 24Male78
25 - 34Female167
25 - 34Male138
35 - 44Female184
35 - 44Male155
45 - 54Female263
45 - 54Male137
55 - 64Female169
55 - 64Male144
65 or overFemale32
65 or overMale27
sum1604

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Arts and Humanities
Sex Profile

Female12655.26%
Male10244.74%
Sum:228100%

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Arts and Humanities
Average Salary by Sex Profile

Staff GroupSex CountAverage Salary
Non Clin. AcademicFemale5750,827
Non Clin. AcademicMale6457,769
Non Clin. ResearchFemale1636,689
Non Clin. ResearchMale1734,642
OtherFemale5327,339
OtherMale2126,994
sum228

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Arts and Humanities
Age Band by Sex Profile

Age BandSex Count
below 160
16 - 240
25 - 34Female31
25 - 34Male15
35 - 44Female38
35 - 44Male30
45 - 54Female30
45 - 54Male30
55 - 64Female25
55 - 64Male23
65 or overFemale2
65 or overMale4
sum228

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Law
Sex Profile

Female4060.61%
Male2639.39%
Sum:66100%

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Law
Average Salary by Sex Profile

Staff GroupSex CountAverage Salary
Non Clin. AcademicFemale2650,787
Non Clin. AcademicMale2254,676
OtherFemale1423,424
OtherMale430,911
sum66

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Law
Age Band by Sex Profile

Age BandSex Count
below 160
16 - 240
25 - 34Female4
25 - 34Male7
35 - 44Female20
35 - 44Male10
45 - 54Female11
45 - 54Male4
55 - 64Female5
55 - 64Male3
65 or overMale2
sum66

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Medicine, BioScience and Psychology
Sex Profile

Female53655.60%
Male42844.40%
Sum:964100%

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Medicine, BioScience and Psychology
Average Salary by Sex Profile

Staff GroupSex CountAverage Salary
Clinical AcademicFemale1778,475
Clinical AcademicMale7589,207
Clinical ResearchFemale1245,953
Clinical ResearchMale3048,952
Non Clin. AcademicFemale6052,899
Non Clin. AcademicMale12560,211
Non Clin. ResearchFemale14435,280
Non Clin. ResearchMale10335,774
OtherFemale30326,618
OtherMale9532,752
sum964

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Medicine, BioScience and Psychology
Age Band by Sex Profile

Age BandSex Count
below 160
16 - 24Female6
25 - 34Female144
25 - 34Male72
35 - 44Female157
35 - 44Male121
45 - 54Female143
45 - 54Male135
55 - 64Female80
55 - 64Male84
65 or overFemale6
65 or overMale16
sum964

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Science and Engineering
Sex Profile

Female14628.24%
Male37171.76%
Sum:517100%

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Science and Engineering
Average Salary by Sex Profile

Staff GroupSex CountAverage Salary
Non Clin. AcademicFemale2355,956
Non Clin. AcademicMale16057,659
Non Clin. ResearchFemale3834,082
Non Clin. ResearchMale7637,385
OtherFemale8525,836
OtherMale13532,357
sum517

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Science and Engineering
Age Band by Sex Profile

Age BandSex Count
below 160
16 - 24Female3
16 - 24Male3
25 - 34Female44
25 - 34Male79
35 - 44Female42
35 - 44Male103
45 - 54Female43
45 - 54Male98
55 - 64Female14
55 - 64Male74
65 or overMale14
sum517

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Social Sciences
Sex Profile

Female26656.24%
Male20743.76%
Sum:473100%

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Social Sciences
Average Salary by Sex Profile

Staff GroupSex CountAverage Salary
Non Clin. AcademicFemale9049,754
Non Clin. AcademicMale12559,300
Non Clin. ResearchFemale728,630
Non Clin. ResearchMale335,327
OtherFemale16926,381
OtherMale7925,283
sum473

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015

Faculty of Social Sciences
Age Band by Sex Profile

Age BandSex Count
below 160
16 - 24Female4
25 - 34Female52
25 - 34Male56
35 - 44Female84
35 - 44Male59
45 - 54Female68
45 - 54Male46
55 - 64Female52
55 - 64Male32
65 or overFemale6
65 or overMale14
sum473

UoSB HR Information Team July 2015


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